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Middle School Handbook

2019-2020 

Welcome from the Head of Middle School

Dear Middle School students and parents,

Welcome to the 2019–2020 school year. We are pleased to offer the Middle School Hand- book to Middle School families to keep you informed, set a positive tone for academic life, and ensure the welfare of the Middle School community. We encourage you to reference the handbook throughout the school year.

Please review the handbook with your child before the school year. There are many helpful tips to get the year off to a good start. The handbook is intended to inform and assist families. Please do not hesitate to contact me at (585) 442-1777 ext. 1160 should questions arise.

Thank you for entrusting your child to The Harley School and the Middle School team. It is a privilege to work with your child, and we welcome the positive contributions that they bring to The Harley School community and the Middle School.

Sincerely,

Hassan Jones, Ed.D.

Table of Contents

General Information

Academic Teams

Academics

Grades

Attendance and Communication

Disciplinary Action

Discrimination and Harassment

Community Information

Ground Rules

Library and Computer Resources

School Traditions

Faculty and Staff

General Information

Mission Statement

The Harley School Mission

We are a diverse, inclusive school. We provide a balanced education that prepares our students to meet the challenges of tomorrow and lead lives of great purpose.

1. We inspire academic excellence.
2. We foster joy in learning in both the arts and sciences.
3. We promote physical and mental fitness.
4. We show how to care for the world and other people.
5. We empower our students to become confident, life long learners.

Adopted by the Board of Trustees, May 2015.

Student Rights and Responsibilities

Acceptance of differences. Respect for others. Self-respect. These are the pillars of a Harley education. The following principles are taught and practiced from Nursery to graduation.

I have the right to have the respect of others. I have the responsibility to respect others.

I have the right to feel safe.
I have the responsibility to help others feel safe.

I have the right to an atmosphere that promotes learning.
I have a responsibility to promote learning through my preparation and participation.

I have the right to have my property respected.
I have the responsibility to respect the property of others.

I have the right to expect the best of others.
I have a responsibility to be my personal best.

Commitment to Diversity

The Harley School believes diversity enriches all groups and communities and the individuals who are part of them. Diversity of race, ethnicity, geographical origin, religion, gender, gender identity, sexual orientation, familial or economic status, etc., forms the fabric of our society. The Harley School seeks out students, families, and employees who value and contribute to the diversity of our institution and community.

Diversity Mission

In “The Characteristics of a Harley Graduate,” a faculty-driven aspirational document that guides our decision-making and vision, we say we seek to cultivate, “A civic person … a pluralist (globally aware, tolerant, appreciative of difference); a respectful steward
of community and environment; and a compassionate individual who knows what it means to take care of another human being.”

A commitment to pluralism and empathy, then, is integral to the mission and purpose of the School. We see a pluralistic and empathetic outlook as a core “outcome” for our students.

Toward that end, we seek to be a diverse community in which diversity in all its forms is cherished and freely explored. We do so in academic contexts, choosing reading and project work that supports this goal; we do so in community contexts, cultivating mutual understanding and respect among our students and a sense of responsibility to the broader community; we do so in social contexts, developing the skills of empathy, appreciation, and collaborative problem-solving; we do so in admissions, financial aid, and hiring, as we invite underrepresented populations to join our community; and we do so in all of our everyday decision-making.

We further commit to regular self-assessment of our diversity mission and the effectiveness of our ongoing efforts to live up to these aspirations.

Community Expectations for Students

The Harley School expects all students to work to their highest capabilities, to join as fully as possible in the opportunities of the School, and to become independent learners and responsible citizens of the community. Our program necessitates that students have strong motivation and abilities in order to succeed in a challenging academic atmosphere.

The Harley faculty aims to support all of our students in becoming progressively indepen- dent as learners. From Lower to Middle to Upper School, we prepare Harley graduates to be both intellectually self-reliant and collaborative as problem solvers.
We believe these habits of achievement are not inborn, but that they can be mastered with the proper education and support.

We are prepared to offer accommodations for students with specific learning differences who are able to compensate in ways that allow them to meet our grade-level or course requirements. We work in close partnership with our families toward these ends. However, Harley does not have the resources available to serve students with diagnosed learning dif- ferences who are unable to meet the demanding reading, writing, analytical, and behavioral requirements of our academic program. For this reason, Harley reserves the right to determine whether the needs of the student can be met in our educational program. For more detail regarding accommodations and modifications at each division level, contact the appropriate Division Head.

When student behavior is disrespectful or disruptive, Harley will take appropriate disci- plinary or educational steps and may require counseling or other agreed-upon therapeu- tic support.

When a student is unable to meet the School’s academic or behavioral expectations, the School reserves the right to separate from the student.

School Motto

“Become What Thou Art.”

Alma Mater

To thee, O Harley
We our voices raise,
Long may the green and white
Before us blaze.
As the great oak
Must from the acorn start,
So be our endeavor,
Become what thou art!
Dear Alma Mater,
Thee we stand before,
Pledging our loyalty
Forevermore.

Words by the Class of 1941
Music by Webbe

Symbols
Lower School: The Acorn
Middle School: The Oak Leaf
Upper School: The Oak Tree
Class Banners

The Eagle / Class of 2020
The Eagle is the bird living in the full light of the sun, representing the warmth of life. We strive to be bold, venturesome, and proud.

The Griffin / Class of 2021
The Griffin represents the light of dawn turning to gold. We grow in our own vision of ourselves: vigilant, kind, and helpful to others.

Two Unicorns / Class of 2022
Two Unicorns symbolize the virtue and strength of mind and body. We cooperate in work and in play. We cherish goodness in others.

The Horn / Class of 2023
The Horn symbolizes the strength to open a path for oneself. We protect those less strong, and we mature to appreciate beauty in all things.

The Crescent / Class of 2024
The Crescent represents a world of changing forms. It shows us as developing people in an orderly universe striving for peace
and understanding.

Deer on Slope / Class of 2025
Deer on Slope symbolizes swiftness and gentleness. It represents growth from awkward beauty into grace and longevity of commitment.

Visor and Swords / Class of 2026
Visor and Swords shows the penetrating power of the intellect with newfound assurance.
We combine ambition with courage and justice.

The Dragon / Class of 2027
The Dragon represents us as creatures of courage and vigilance. We grow in wisdom as we grow
in strength.

Stag on Chevron / Class of 2028
Stag on Chevron symbolizes the cycles of renewal and growth.
We gain agility as we leave shyness and solitude for playfulness and joy.

The Unicorn / Class of 2029
The Unicorn shows us as creatures of dreams, magic, and imagination. We develop virtue and strength of mind and body.

Fleur-de-Lis / Class of 2030
Fleur-de-Lis is the symbol of illumination, the flower of light and life. We strive toward balance and discipline, purpose and dedication.

The Torch / Class of 2031
The Torch shows us as a light to our School, our friends, our families.
It represents the emblem of truth and illumination.

Academic Teams, Advisors, Middle School Head, & Assistant/Registrar

Teams
Middle School faculty members are divided into two grade-level teams, one for Grades 5 and 6, the other for Grades 7 and 8. The small class groupings provide a comfortable atmosphere that allows faculty to better serve and nurture student needs. The teachers on each team meet once a week to discuss academic and social issues pertinent to the class and/or individual students. Team leaders coordinate the annual camping trip/ outings, as well as many of the other grade-level social activities.
Homeroom Advisor
The Homeroom Advisor serves as an advocate for students. The Homeroom Advisor collects appropriate input about students and is the first source of contact for parents for general academic or social concerns. The Homeroom Advisor also serves as parent liaison and meets with parents during fall and spring conferences.
When an advisor has a concern about work or behavior, they will speak directly with the student. If there is a disciplinary problem, the student’s advisor is included in discussion and plans. Middle School teams know who a student’s advisor is and communicate with them as often as necessary.
The central objective of the advisory system is to provide each student in the Middle School with at least one teacher who takes a special and continuing interest in the student’s total growth. The advisor seeks to know the student, not merely as a student but as a person, and tries to ensure that all of the student’s experiences at Harley contribute to their growth.
Middle School Head
Faculty teams are led by the Middle School Head (MSH). The MSH oversees the depart- ment curriculum, resources, scheduling, budget, and personnel. The MSH meets weekly with the Head of School and other Division Heads. The MSH communicates across departments and among the three divisions (Lower School, Middle School, and Upper School) to encourage interdisciplinary connections.

The Middle School Head’s duty is to lead the Middle School faculty as they are overseeing the academic and personal progress of every student. The MSH collaborates with faculty leaders in the coordination of curriculum along with the Head of School. The MSH represents the Middle School at events and functions, including Parent Council and Board of Trustee meetings. The MSH is always available to students and families for academic counseling and problem-solving.

The Middle School Assistant/Registrar
The Middle School Assistant/Registrar is the parents’ first point of contact with the Middle School Office. General questions should be directed to the Assistant/Registrar who reports directly to the Middle School Head. The role of Middle School Assistant/ Registrar is broad and encompasses all general day-to-day office functions, including scheduling and student records.

Academics

Academic Integrity

The integrity of a student’s work is the building block of any academic community and should never be taken lightly. Your work must be your work, in every instance.
That said, the faculty encourages students to work and study together. Being able to explain concepts to one another is an important step in the learning process. Help your friends learn by showing them where the information can be found, asking leading questions or clarifying the assignment, but not by doing others’ work for them or letting them see or copy your work. Assume these principles apply to all situations unless specifically told otherwise by the teacher. If in doubt about how these concepts apply
to specific situation, the student should ask their teacher.
The following are considered types of academic dishonesty at Harley:

  • Uncited material: When a student finds information, images, sounds, etc., in a source and includes it in his or her work without citing the source.

  • Uncited ideas: When a student finds an idea in a text and writes it into their paper without citing the source.

  • Verbatim phrase or passage that is not quoted: When a student finds an exact phrase/sentence/passage and writes it into their paper without citing the source.

  • Uncited structure or organizing strategy: When a student’s paper/paragraph is organized in the same manner as a source that they accessed but did not cite.

  • Misrepresenting evidence: When a student alters and/or intentionally misinterprets a source’s meaning.

  • Improper collaboration: When students work together on an assignment, project, paper, etc., without permission from the course teacher.

  • Dual or overlapping submissions: When a student passes in a paper or part of a
    paper to two or more teachers without the prior permission of the teachers to do so.

  • Falsifying evidence or citations: When a student fabricates evidence or citations.

  • Abetting plagiarism: When a student helps another engage in academic dishonesty.

  • Improper use of electronic media or technology: When a student uses such tools inappropriately (for example, using an online translation program in a foreign language course).

    These guidelines were adapted from Writing with Sources: A Guide for Harvard Students, by Gordon Harvey. Hackett Publishing, Indianapolis, 1998. It should be noted that individual teachers may set additional guidelines.

    If a student is found to have violated the School’s academic integrity policy, disciplinary action will follow. At a minimum, the student will receive a zero on the assignment in question, even if it is a major exam, and they may be asked redo the assignment in order to demonstrate understanding, for no credit. It should also be understood that students who knowingly provide material for the academically dishonest use of others will also be subject to disciplinary action.

Exams, Quizzes, and Tests
All students are expected to complete the assignments, quizzes, and exams given to them. When students have diagnosed learning disabilities specified in an Individual Education Plan (IEP) or require accommodations based on a 504 Plan, Middle School faculty are prepared to meet those needs with extended time, clarification of instructions, and separate exam-taking locations. However, the Middle School faculty and administration does not relax basic class assignments and expectations.

Test are always announced ahead of time and posted on Schoology. Tests may cover an entire chapter or unit and may take a full class period to complete. Some quizzes are announced and some are unannounced. Less material is tested on quizzes. Quizzes do not usually take a full class period.

Final exams are only given in Grades 7 and 8 for all full-year academic courses. Exams are usually two hours in length and may count for up to 25 percent of the yearly average. For foreign language exams, there are two parts: oral and written. Each student should come to class prepared with pens and pencils. Review sheets are provided prior to each test, and teachers are available during review week. Midterm exams are given in some courses. Makeup exams are arranged with faculty.

Commitment to Diversity

The Harley School believes diversity enriches all groups and communities and the individuals who are part of them. Diversity of race, ethnicity, geographical origin, religion, gender, gender identity, sexual orientation, familial or economic status, etc., forms the fabric of our society. The Harley School seeks out students, families, and employees who value and contribute to the diversity of our institution and community.

Homework Assignments
Homework is an important part of a student’s education. This is an opportunity to master or fine-tune skills learned in class, expand knowledge in different areas, and review what a student has learned. Assignments vary by subject and time varies by student. The general guideline for Grades 5 and 6 is one to one and a half hours per day. Grades 7 and 8 home- work takes approximately two hours. Homework assignments are given in class and details can be found on Schoology.

Long-term assignments and papers are due several days or weeks after being assigned. Outlines and due dates are provided. It is suggested that students break assignments down into small parts and use planners to schedule time to complete the assignment. The Middle School administrative assistant requests homework for students reporting absent. Students can find homework assignments posted on Schoology. Parents can pick up homework folders after 3:00 p.m. in the Main Office mailbox area, if requested.

Middle School Academic Status Indicators

All Middle School students are expected to maintain passing grades in their core academic subjects. In fifth and sixth grade this means achieving a 3 or 4 and seventh and eighth grade it means maintaining a C or higher. Students who fail to meet these expectations will either receive a formal warning or be placed on probation.

Academic Warning is a formal notice informing parents a student is not meeting expectations in at least 1 core academic subject at the end of a trimester.

Academic Probation is invoked when a student is not meeting expectations in two or more core academic subject areas at the end of a trimester. A student who remains on pro- bation for more than one trimester is at risk of not being invited to re-enroll the
following school year.

Grades 5 and 6
In Grades 5 and 6, students will receive an academic warning if they have a 1 or 2 in more than half of the academic grids in one core subject area at the end of a trimester. Students will be placed on Academic Probation if they have a 1 or 2 in more than half of the academic grids in two or more core subject areas at the end of a trimester.

Grades 7 and 8
In Grades 7 and 8, students will receive an academic warning if they earn a C- or below in one core subject area at the end of a trimester. Students will be placed on Academic Probation (see next page) if they earn a C- or below in two or more core subject areas at the end of a trimester.

Academic Probation Guidelines
  • A study hall will be required and the student must check-in weekly with the teachers in the failing subject areas

  • A weekly academic progress form indicating how the student is doing in the subject areas where improvement is needed, must be signed by parents, and returned to the Head of Middle School

  • The student will not be allowed to participate in extracurricular activities (i.e. sports, musical, etc.)

  • Students on Academic Probation will not be issued a re-enrollment agreement

  • A review of the students academic progress will take place every 6 weeks until the probation is lifted. Any student who remains on probation for more than one trimester is at risk of not being invited to re-enroll the following school year

Supplemental Support Program (SSP)
The Supplemental Support Program (SSP) is a fee-based program designed to assist capable students when learning in School presents special challenges. Our small team of learning specialists helps students in SSP (1) recognize and understand the specific difficulties they have with learning, (2) identify strategies that work for them and assume responsibility for implementing these strategies, and (3) take the lead in advocating for their own needs.

We address the individual needs of learners in developmentally appropriate ways that vary by academic division. The Lower School support program offers more individualization and addresses the development of basic skills and emerging competencies in a variety of settings. Starting in Grade 5, the program supports students in meeting the demanding curricular requirements of the Middle and Upper Schools, but it does not provide reme- diation of significant deficiencies in basic skills.

Grades

General Information

The Harley School’s academic emphasis in the Middle School is on cooperation, learning, understanding, and mastery, rather than on competition and achievement for the sake of grades only. Nevertheless, we must be realistic and aware that we need a balanced teaching and assessment approach, particularly given that (1) a number of our students are achievement-oriented (intrinsically, or instilled by parents) and (2) our students are college-bound and therefore need exposure to traditional methods of grading and assessment. Grades and exams are part of the program in the Middle School; however, they are not the driving force behind teaching, nor are they a means of achieving a predetermined outcome or “product,” which is the case at some schools.

Report Cards

The academic year is divided into trimesters. Grades are reported to parents six times a year, at the middle and end of each trimester. At mid-trimester, parents receive the student’s current grades and comments about their progress. At the end of the trimester, parents receive subject comments and the student’s final grades for that trimester. Comments are included at that time for students with Grades of C-, D, F, or Incomplete.

In addition to these reports, teachers will contact the parents, the student’s advisor, and the Middle School Head in unusual circumstances or in situations where a grade has changed suddenly.

Grades 5 and 6

Teachers remark on student progress in subject areas using a skill level checklist and personal commentary. Students do not receive letter or numerical grades on report cards in Grades 5 and 6, however they do receive grades on daily work.

Grading Key

Work Habits Scale
Indicates feedback on behaviors in and out of the classroom that are important and reflect students’ work habits and level of participation in their education.

Scale                  Work Habits Key
C                          Consistently Demonstrates
I                            Inconsistently Demonstrates

Content Skills Scale
Indicates students’ level of mastery of the skills and concepts presented in each subject area.

Scale                   Content Skills Key
4                           The student independently and                                           consistently applies skills and concepts                               but also frequently extends and                                           elaborates well beyond what is                                             expected.

3                           The student understands and applies                                 skills and concepts presented with                                       independence and consistency.               

2                           The student continues to make                                             progress in developing an independent                               and consistent understanding of skills                                 and concepts, but is having difficulty                                   meeting the current marking period                                     expectations.

1                           The student needs more review and                                    reinforcement and requires significant                                teacher support and assistance. This is                                a targeted area of improvement

Grades 7 and 8

Students in Grades 7 and 8 receive letter grades six times a year on report cards. Final grades are given in every class. Narrative summaries and checklists are used to convey student progress.

Letter Grades
A, A-                       Excellent. The student has a thorough                                 comprehension of ideas and concepts                                 and an ability to work with concepts                                   fluently. Quality of work exceeds                                           expectations.

B+, B, B-                Very good to satisfactory work that                                       also meets the work demands of the                                   course.

C+, C,                      Satisfactory.

C-                            Needs improvement in one or more                                    aspects of the course. Additional                                          work may be recommended to move                                  to next level.

D+, D, D-                Requires substantial work to move to                                  next level, owing to either an                                                inadequate grasp of essential                                                concepts or a failure to meet the                                          work demands of the course.

F                              No pass/no credit. Student needs to                                    repeat the course to move on in this                                    discipline.

I                               Incomplete. Indicates that work                                            essential to the course has not been
                                done or turned in. The comment                                          report from the teacher will specify                                      what has to be made up and the                                          deadline for completion. If the work                                    is not completed by the specified                                         date (no later than six weeks beyond                                   the end of the term in question), the                                   grade automatically becomes an F.                                       For a trimester course, this means                                       that the course must be repeated if                                     credit is required. For a full-year
                               course, the F for a trimester is                                               averaged in with other trimester and                                   final grades.

Pass/Fail
HP (High Pass)     Excellent work
P (Pass)                 Satisfactory work
F (Fail)                   Unsatisfactory work. No credit is given.

Grades

General Information

The Harley School’s academic emphasis in the Middle School is on cooperation, learning, understanding, and mastery, rather than on competition and achievement for the sake of grades only. Nevertheless, we must be realistic and aware that we need a balanced teaching and assessment approach, particularly given that (1) a number of our students are achievement-oriented (intrinsically, or instilled by parents) and (2) our students are college-bound and therefore need exposure to traditional methods of grading and assessment. Grades and exams are part of the program in the Middle School; however, they are not the driving force behind teaching, nor are they a means of achieving a predetermined outcome or “product,” which is the case at some schools.

Report Cards

The academic year is divided into trimesters. Grades are reported to parents six times a year, at the middle and end of each trimester. At mid-trimester, parents receive the student’s current grades and comments about their progress. At the end of the trimester, parents receive subject comments and the student’s final grades for that trimester. Comments are included at that time for students with Grades of C-, D, F, or Incomplete.

In addition to these reports, teachers will contact the parents, the student’s advisor, and the Middle School Head in unusual circumstances or in situations where a grade has changed suddenly.

Grades 5 and 6

Teachers remark on student progress in subject areas using a skill level checklist and personal commentary. Students do not receive letter or numerical grades on report cards in Grades 5 and 6, however they do receive grades on daily work.

Grading Key

Work Habits Scale
Indicates feedback on behaviors in and out of the classroom that are important and reflect students’ work habits and level of participation in their education.

Scale                  Work Habits Key
C                          Consistently Demonstrates
I                            Inconsistently Demonstrates

Content Skills Scale
Indicates students’ level of mastery of the skills and concepts presented in each subject area.

Scale                   Content Skills Key
4                           The student independently and consistently applies                               skills and concepts but also frequently extends and                               elaborates well beyond what is expected.

3                           The student understands and applies skills and                                       concepts presented with independence and                                             consistency.               

2                           The student continues to make progress in                                               developing an independent and consistent                                               understanding of skills  and concepts, but is having                               difficulty meeting the current marking period                                           expectations.

1                           The student needs more review and reinforcement                               and requires significant teacher support and                                           assistance. This is a targeted area of improvement

Grades 7 and 8

Students in Grades 7 and 8 receive letter grades six times a year on report cards. Final grades are given in every class. Narrative summaries and checklists are used to convey student progress.

 

Letter Grades
A, A-                       Excellent. The student has a thorough                                                       comprehension of ideas and concepts and an                                         ability to work with concepts fluently. Quality of                                       work exceeds expectations.

 

B+, B, B-                Very good to satisfactory work that also meets the                                 work demands of the course.

 

C+, C,                      Satisfactory.

 

C-                            Needs improvement in one or more aspects of                                        the course. Additional work may be                                                            recommended to move to next level.

 

D+, D, D-                Requires substantial work to move to next level,                                      owing to either an inadequate grasp of essential                                    concepts or a failure to meet the work demands                                    of the course.

 

F                              No pass/no credit. Student needs to repeat the                                      course to move on in this discipline.

 

I                               Incomplete. Indicates that work essential to the                                      course has not been done or turned in. The                                              comment report from the teacher will specify                                          what has to be made up and the deadline for                                          completion. If the work is not completed by the                                      specified date (no later than six weeks beyond the                                  end of the term in question), the grade                                                      automatically becomes an F. For a trimester                                            course, this means that the course must be                                              repeated if credit is required. For a full-                                                    year course, the F for a trimester is averaged in                                      with other trimester and final grades.

 

Pass/Fail
HP (High Pass)     Excellent work
P (Pass)                 Satisfactory work
F (Fail)                   Unsatisfactory work. No credit is given.

 

Grades

General Information

The Harley School’s academic emphasis in the Middle School is on cooperation, learning, understanding, and mastery, rather than on competition and achievement for the sake of grades only. Nevertheless, we must be realistic and aware that we need a balanced teaching and assessment approach, particularly given that (1) a number of our students are achievement-oriented (intrinsically, or instilled by parents) and (2) our students are college-bound and therefore need exposure to traditional methods of grading and assessment. Grades and exams are part of the program in the Middle School; however, they are not the driving force behind teaching, nor are they a means of achieving a predetermined outcome or “product,” which is the case at some schools.

Report Cards

The academic year is divided into trimesters. Grades are reported to parents six times a year, at the middle and end of each trimester. At mid-trimester, parents receive the student’s current grades and comments about their progress. At the end of the trimester, parents receive subject comments and the student’s final grades for that trimester. Comments are included at that time for students with Grades of C-, D, F, or Incomplete.

In addition to these reports, teachers will contact the parents, the student’s advisor, and the Middle School Head in unusual circumstances or in situations where a grade has changed suddenly.

Grades 5 and 6

Teachers remark on student progress in subject areas using a skill level checklist and personal commentary. Students do not receive letter or numerical grades on report cards in Grades 5 and 6, however they do receive grades on daily work.

Grading Key

Work Habits Scale
Indicates feedback on behaviors in and out of the classroom that are important and reflect students’ work habits and level of participation in their education.

Scale                  Work Habits Key
C                          Consistently                                                   Demonstrates
I                            Inconsistently                                                 Demonstrates

Content Skills Scale
Indicates students’ level of mastery of the skills and concepts presented in each subject area.

Scale                   Content Skills Key
4                           The student                                                    independently and                                        consistently applies                                      skills and concepts but                                also frequently                                              extends and elaborates well beyond what is expected.

3                           The student understands and applies skills and                                       concepts presented with independence and                                             consistency.               

2                           The student continues to make progress in                                               developing an independent and consistent                                               understanding of skills  and concepts, but is having                               difficulty meeting the current marking period                                           expectations.

1                           The student needs more review and reinforcement                               and requires significant teacher support and                                           assistance. This is a targeted area of improvement

Grades 7 and 8

Students in Grades 7 and 8 receive letter grades six times a year on report cards. Final grades are given in every class. Narrative summaries and checklists are used to convey student progress.

 

Letter Grades
A, A-                       Excellent. The student has a thorough                                                       comprehension of ideas and concepts and an                                         ability to work with concepts fluently. Quality of                                       work exceeds expectations.

 

B+, B, B-                Very good to satisfactory work that also meets the                                 work demands of the course.

 

C+, C,                      Satisfactory.

 

C-                            Needs improvement in one or more aspects of                                        the course. Additional work may be                                                            recommended to move to next level.

 

D+, D, D-                Requires substantial work to move to next level,                                      owing to either an inadequate grasp of essential                                    concepts or a failure to meet the work demands                                    of the course.

 

F                              No pass/no credit. Student needs to repeat the                                      course to move on in this discipline.

 

I                               Incomplete. Indicates that work essential to the                                      course has not been done or turned in. The                                              comment report from the teacher will specify                                          what has to be made up and the deadline for                                          completion. If the work is not completed by the                                      specified date (no later than six weeks beyond the                                  end of the term in question), the grade                                                      automatically becomes an F. For a trimester                                            course, this means that the course must be                                              repeated if credit is required. For a full-                                                    year course, the F for a trimester is averaged in                                      with other trimester and final grades.

 

Pass/Fail
HP (High Pass)     Excellent work
P (Pass)                 Satisfactory work
F (Fail)                   Unsatisfactory work. No credit is given.

 

Attendance and Communication

Attendance

Parents are asked to call the Middle School administrative assistant (585-442-1770 ext. 1161) or nurse (585-442-1770 ext. 1210) by 8:00 a.m. and email the student’s homeroom advisor if a student will be late or absent for illness or other reasons. Parents may call before hours and leave a message. If the reason for a student’s absence is not known by 9:00 a.m., the School will make follow-up phone calls. Absences should be reported each day of a prolonged absence, unless the School has been notified that the student will be out for an extended period of time.

Punctuality is expected. Students are expected to be at school with their homework completed on a daily basis. The first bell rings at 8:00 a.m. and the homeroom bell rings at 8:10 a.m. Middle School students must sign in at the Main Office desk if they arrive after 8:10 a.m. or are returning to school after an appointment. During homeroom advisory, attendance is taken and information about the day’s events is shared. Attendance is reported on students’ report cards and includes the number of days late and absent.

Prearranged Absences

On occasion, a family may choose to take a student out of school for reasons other than illness or emergency (a family trip, for example). The student must obtain a Prearranged Absence Form from the Middle School administrative assistant at least two weeks prior to the absence. Parents should notify the student’s Homeroom Advisor and the Middle School Office. It is important to note that while the School is flexible, it is not responsible for making special arrangements for those who choose to be absent. Students should not automatically expect that teachers will give assignments in advance, or arrange tests, etc. Students are held accountable for what is missed in classes and homework.

Signing In and Out

Students who enter or exit the School during the school day must only use the front entrance (through the Gallery) and must sign in/out at the receptionist’s desk. Students must have a note with parental permission to leave campus; this note should be emailed to or left with the Middle School Office. New York State requires that a parent write the date, time, and reason for any early dismissal, absence, or tardiness. Students must sign in upon returning to school. In an emergency, students may call a parent from the Middle School Office, and the parent can give the administrative assistant permission for the student to leave school. If a student becomes ill at school, they must go to the nurse. The nurse will contact a parent to arrange transportation home, if appropriate. The student must sign out at the front desk before leaving (or be signed out by a parent). If a student feels ill at school and is unable to attend a class or take a test, they must go to the Nurse’s Office. The nurse will evaluate the problem.

Messages and Telephone Calls

Middle School parents should contact their child’s advisor via email to relay messages to their child, and copy the Middle School administrative assistant on communication. Middle School faculty and staff check email throughout the day. Parents may also call the Main Office or Middle School administrative assistant with urgent messages. Students may use the phone in the Middle School Office or the Main Office to reach their parents. There is a message board located in the Middle School main hallway for students to check throughout the day. Emergency messages for students are delivered personally.

Texting and Use of Cell Phones

The Middle School administration recognizes that cell phones are a useful way for parents to coordinate transportation and relay information to their child. However, the use of cell phones is not allowed during the school day, 8:00 a.m. until 3:00 p.m., without permission from a faculty member. Students found using cell phones without permission or in an inappropriate manner will have the device taken and held in the Middle School Office until the end of the school day. In some cases of misuse, parents will need to see the Head of Middle School to retrieve the phone.

TV, Movies, Computers, Other Devices

Middle School students may only bring computers and other electronic devices to school for academic purposes. The use of electronic devices is not allowed during the school day, 8:00 a.m. until 3:00 p.m., without permission from a faculty member. Students found using electronic devices without permission or in an inappropriate manner will have the device taken and held in the Middle School Office until the end of the school day. In some cases of misuse, parents will need to see the Head of Middle School to retrieve the device.

Parents should remind their child that they are responsible for protecting their own phones and electronic equipment from theft and accidental damage. The School cannot be responsible for phones, laptops, and other personal electronic devices brought on campus.

Disciplinary Action

General Information

All Harley School students are held to the same standards of behavior. The goals of disciplinary action are to teach individuals productive ways of managing themselves in a group and to protect the rights and responsibilities of other learners. Serious disciplinary action is considered under the following situations:

  1. Repeated interference with the learning environment
  2. Unsafe conduct which places self or others in jeopardy
  3. An extremely distasteful, disrespectful, or dangerous act
Approach to problem resolution of chronic misbehavior

Our disciplinary process is tailored to the individual and the presenting situation. There is an art to helping individuals; recognize their own problematic behavior, accept the need for change, and adopt corrective strategies.

We approach the resolution of problematic behavior and difficult situations by choosing among a variety of techniques, including: intervention by an individual teacher or teaching team; reprimands and other punishments; documentation of concerns in an Incident Report or other written form; consultation with the Division Head or previous teachers; notification of parents by Division Head or teacher; conference among teachers, administrators, and/or parents and outside specialists; development of an Action Plan; notification of parents of conference results and Action Plan.

When these approaches are not successful, changes in disciplinary status (probation, suspension, withdrawal of privileges) will be determined by the Division Head. When such disciplinary actions are still not successful in ending the problematic behavior, or in the event of a singularly highly dangerous or extremely distasteful, disrespectful, or dangerous act, the Division Head and Head of School will meet with the parents, and the Head of School.

Discrimination and Harassment

Non-Discrimination Policy

The School admits students of any race, color, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, and national or ethnic origin to all of the rights, privileges, programs, and activities generally accorded or made available to students at the School. It does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national or ethnic origin, sex, sexual orientation, or gender identity or expression in the administration of its educational policies, admission policies, scholarship and loan programs, staff hiring practices, and athletic or other School-administered programs.

Non-Harassment Policy

Harley recognizes the right of everyone to be in an environment where individual dignity is respected, and the School is committed to maintaining an environment free from all forms of harassment. The purpose of this policy is not to regulate personal morality, but to ensure that, at Harley, no one harasses another individual. Everyone in the Harley community will be held accountable for accomplishing our goal of maintaining a harassment-free environment.

Guidelines

The creation of an intimidating, hostile, and/or offensive environment may constitute harassment. Harassment does not only depend upon the offender’s intention but also upon how the person who is the object of such harassment perceives the behavior or is affected by it.

The Harley School will not tolerate harassment on the basis of characteristics including, but not necessarily limited to, race, age, marital status, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, color, religion, disability, ethnic heritage, or national origin.

I. Definitions

A. Verbal harassment: This refers to derogatory or vulgar comments directed toward any individual, or the distribution of written or graphic material having the same effect with respect to the foregoing categories (which, again, are not exhaustive).

B. Physical harassment: This refers to physical advances such as hitting, pushing, or other physical contact or intimidation, or threats of same.

C. Sexual harassment: This refers to unwelcome sexual advances, or
behavior that is intended to obtain sexual favors as a term or condition of employment or as the basis for any work-related decision. Verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature that interferes with an individual’s performance or creates an intimidating, hostile, humiliating, or sexually offensive environment also constitutes sexual harassment.

II. Policy Administration

A. This policy shall be administered fairly and impartially by the parties charged with its implementation.

B. This policy applies to students, employees, volunteers, and any other individual who is involved with the business or activities of Harley.

Process

Any individual who believes that he or she has been subjected to harassment should report the alleged harassment immediately to a teacher, advisor, or administrator (in the case of a student reporting), or to his or her supervisor. If the supervisor is the alleged harasser, the report should be made to any other administrator. Written documentation will, at some point, support the allegations of harassment.

• Documentation will include information relating to the date and place of the incidents, a description of the alleged harassment, and any other information that relates to and supports the complaint.

• Administrators, teachers, or advisors who observe or have been made aware of the harassment will act to terminate such behavior and take whatever action may be warranted to prevent its recurrence.

• An investigation of all complaints will be undertaken by the appropriate party. During the investigation, every reasonable effort will be made to protect the privacy of the individuals involved. At the same time, the investigative process will endeavor to protect against capriciousness or unfounded complaints.

• One’s status will not be jeopardized for filing a valid complaint.

Appeal Procedures

If the resulting decision is felt to be unfair or improper, an appeal procedure is available. A request for further resolution may be brought to the direct attention of the Head of the School. If still not satisfied, the problem may be presented in writing to the President of the Board of Trustees. The party may then be invited to meet with the President. After a thorough review of relevant facts and prior decisions, the President will render a final and binding decision.

Conclusion

Our commitment to fostering a pleasant work/learning environment on the Harley campus will be ensured by adherence to the foregoing principles and procedures.

Community Information

Afterschool Programs

After-school programs vary by trimester. Please contact the Middle School administrative assistant at (585) 442-1770 ext. 1161 for more information.

Assemblies

Some special assemblies during the school year are Opening Day, Thanksgiving, the Lower School Pageant, and the Honors Assembly. Additional assemblies are arranged throughout the year. Parents are notified and invited to assemblies when students are featured.

Awards and Scholarships

The Oak Leaf Award is given to a Grade 8 student at the end of the school year who best exemplifies qualities valued by the Harley community.

The Pollack Scholarship is given to a Grade 8 student who actively volunteers within and outside of the Harley community.

The Bill Dalton Humanities Award is given to a Grade 8 student who excels in the understanding and knowledge of the humanities.

Coffeehouse

The Middle School/Upper School Coffeehouses are informal evenings of songs, music, poetry, and drama performed by Harley students and faculty. The Coffeehouse Committee coordinates contributions of baked goods and beverages and sells these at the Spring and Fall Coffeehouses. Proceeds from the Coffeehouses go directly to the Drama and Music departments.

Day Sheet

The day sheet, popularly known as “The Scoop Sheet,” is read every morning in homeroom advisory and contains general School messages, the lunch menu, lost and found, HAC sporting events, drama and musical performances, practice schedules, etc. Messages for the day sheet are collected by the Main Office receptionist.

Dress Code

Middle School, students begin maturing and experience puberty. With rapid growth and puberty in mind, parents and students are asked to consider the following parameters for dress:

  • The length of skirts and/or shorts should not be revealing. The fingertip test can be a good measure. Skirts and shorts should not be shorter than the student’s fingertips when their arms are resting at their sides.
  • Pants and shorts must not come below the hipline.
  • Undergarments should not be visible.
  • Necklines should not be revealing.
  • Clothing should not be inappropriately tight.
  • Graphics and language on clothing, jewelry, bags, and backpacks should not be offensive. Dress that interferes with the work or learning environment will be addressed by the faculty or administration. Certainly “provocative” dress would qualify, as would any clothing that conveys a message that might be offensive to others.

We understand that a student’s appearance is often an important expression of their individuality. In a community, however, one must consider the impact of any behavior or habit on one’s fellow community members—mutual respect and consideration are the central principles at work. Middle School students are encouraged to be safe, appropriate, and confident when choosing clothing to wear to school. Middle School students are expected to be well-groomed and neatly dressed.

Middle School students are asked to dress appropriately for special events at Harley, including Candlelight, concerts, and the Honors Assembly.

Clothing options:

  • Dress shirt, tie, dress slacks
  • Dress, skirt, or dress pants
  • No jeans or sneakers
Emergency Evacuation Location

In the event of a School evacuation, students should gather at the First Baptist Church of Rochester on the corner of Clover Street and Allens Creek Road. The address is 175 Allens Creek Road, Rochester, NY 14618, and the phone number is (585) 224-2468.

Field Trips and Outdoor Education

All Middle School classes take field trips. Outdoor education trips are taken by Grades 6, 7, and 8. Outdoor education trips often include overnight camping. Parent information is sent home before trips and details are covered. Permission forms must be signed for student participation. Programs are planned by teachers. A general list of trips can be found in the Curriculum Guide.

Information Changes

If at any time during the school year, there is a change in a student’s home address, phone number, or a parent’s work information, the change should be reported to the Middle School administrative assistant.

Lost and Found

Students sometimes misplace personal items and clothing. Students should report missing items to their Homeroom Advisor first. Students are discouraged from bringing expensive items to school. Lost and Found locations for Middle-School students are the Middle School Office and the Main Office reception area. A Lost and Found area is also located in the Field House for gym clothes and uniforms.

Middle School News

The Head of Middle School communicates Middle School news through email.

Parent Council

The Harley School Parent Council is an energetic and enthusiastic group of parent volunteers who strive to build a strong Harley community and promote effective communication among the Board, parents, faculty members, and administrators.

All parents of Harley students are automatically members of Parent Council and are encouraged to participate in Parent Council activities.

Parent Night

In September or October, parents of current Harley students are invited to the School to meet teachers and discuss curricular reports from each class or subject.

Planners and Organization

Each Middle School student receives a Harley planner and is encouraged to record daily assignments. The goal is to develop students who are organized, independent, and responsible workers.

Publications

Becoming Magazine is schoolwide alumni publication that comes out once a year. The  Acorn Press and Calliope, a literary publication, are produced by Upper School students.

School Closings

If Harley closes due to weather conditions, or for any other reason, announcements will be made through calls to parents by the Emergency Notification System, as well as on the radio, Harley’s website (www.harleyschool.org), local news channels, and the School’s voicemail greeting. Because Harley students come from a wide geographic area and conditions can vary greatly, the School stays open unless weather conditions are severe. Parents should use their own judgment in deciding if conditions are safe for travel. If the School is closed, after-school activities are also canceled.

In the event of a closing during the school day, it will be announced as stated above. Lower School students will be released according to instructions on record from parents. Students in Grades 5 through 12 who ride the school bus will be sent home by bus. If you have any questions about bus transportation, please contact your district’s transportation office.

Schoology

Schoology is a secure online social-learning network. Schoology provides a controlled environment that ensures safe interaction while nurturing students’ social and academic development. Middle School students are required to use Schoology for class assignment notifications and comments, communication with teachers, and Middle School updates.

Study Hall

Study hall is part of Flex Time. It provides a quiet place for students to complete homework, read, review their notes, and study for tests. Study hall also provides time during the school day for students to use the library or talk with an advisor. Time spent in study hall may be used effectively if students follow these guidelines:

  • Be prepared
  • Be quiet
  • Be respectful
  • Bring outside reading
Summer Reading

Every grade has required summer reading. Lists are posted online and mailed home.

Supporting Harley

We can never thank our contributors enough for supporting The Harley School. Gifts are essential to the success of the School, helping extend a life-changing experience to numerous students and families for whom our programs would otherwise be out of reach. Your generosity not only funds student opportunities and daily operations in a given school year but also reflects an ongoing commitment to our collective mission.

Visitors

We absolutely welcome visitors to Harley—students may bring guests to classes for the day and to school dances if they have prior permission from the Head of Middle School. Visitors should spend the entire day or dance with the host, and the host is responsible for their guest’s behavior. Drop-in student visitors are not permitted.

Arrival and Dismissal

The school week is Monday through Friday. The first bell of the school day rings at 8:00 a.m. The homeroom bell rings at 8:10 a.m. Students arriving before 8:00 a.m. should report directly to the Dining Hall. School is dismissed at 3:00 p.m.

Students are expected to be picked up by 3:00 p.m. After-school care is available for a fee until 4:30 p.m. A snack is provided in the Dining Hall and students may study in the Library. Extended Day is also available for an additional charge. Extended Day ends at 6:00 p.m. Please contact the Middle School Office for afterschool forms.

Athletics

In the Middle School, the physical and recreational needs of students are met through a wide variety of activities that help students develop coordination, strength, skills, and endurance. By participating in various physical education programs, students learn values that last a lifetime. Middle School students in Grades 7 and 8 are strongly encouraged to play on HAC (Harley-Allendale Columbia combined sports) after-school teams. Team offerings are the same as in Upper School. Students may move up to play on JV or varsity teams if the coaches and parents determine they are ready.

Blast!

Blast! is the School’s premier fundraising event. There are two evenings of fun you can attend in support. The proceeds directly impact every student and also provide funding for Horizons at Harley, a six-week summer enrichment program for Rochester City School District students.

Dances

Middle School dances are held two times a year, in the fall and spring, from 7 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. The exact dates vary and can be found on The Harley School calendar. The dances are combined events with Allendale Columbia and are rotated between campuses. The dances are for Grades 6, 7 and 8. Parental permission slips must be returned for students to participate in Middle School dances.

Displays of Affection

Students should refrain from engaging in personal displays of affection that are inappropriate for a school setting. Displays of affection are to be confined to holding hands.

Drop-off/Pickup Guidelines

Expert committees have laid out the best traffic patterns for busy drop-offs and pickups. Parents should follow these guidelines:

  • Never park in the bus lane or on any pickup or drop-off route. If you need to park, use a parking space.
  • Never make a left turn against traffic during pickup! Plan your approach and departure strategically. At the busiest time of day, entering the School by turning left from Clover Street blocks through traffic.
  • Never turn left onto Clover Street when leaving the School. It’s safer to take the longer route around the block at pickup time.

School is dismissed at 3:00 p.m., but parents who come at 3:10 p.m. or so often have a much smoother pickup. If you don’t have a pressing need to arrive early, consider showing up after the crowds have gone.

Locations
The drop-off locations for Middle School and Upper School students are the Beckerman entrance and the Main Office entrance for late arrivals. The pickup location for Middle School and Upper School students is the Field House entrance. Using the correct drop-off and pickup locations greatly improves traffic flow and minimizes the need for students to walk where buses and cars are moving.

Flex Time

Flex Time is designed to meet the individual interests and needs of students. Flex Time takes place at the end of the school day, from 2:10 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. During this time period, students in Grades 6, 7, and 8 can select from various enrichment options, use the time for study hall, or undertake other independent activities. Students may choose to participate in a club, meet with teachers, work on approved projects, or sign up for a mini elective class or seminar. Flex Time opportunities change each trimester.

Forms

MS forms, including admissions, athletics, divisional, and nurse’s forms, are located on the Parent Portal. Permission slips for special events are sent home with students or emailed.

Lockers

All Middle School students are assigned two lockers at the beginning of the school year, one in the Middle School hallway and one in the Field House. Parents and students receive a Welcome Back letter from the Head of Middle School in August. This letter contains dates and times for new and returning students to come in and set up lockers prior to the first day of school.

Students are asked to put everything in their lockers to protect personal belongings. Lockers should be kept neat, clean, and organized. Lockers are subject to periodic checks by faculty.

Lunch and Recess

We know a healthy lunch is important for a child’s cognitive and physical growth. The Harley lunch program serves as a model for public and private schools alike. Healthy choices are offered, and the School serves wholegrain breads and pasta, fresh vegetables and fruits, 100 percent fruit juices, low-fat milk, brown rice, yogurt, homemade soups, and a salad bar with more than 30 different items daily. There is no additional fee for lunches. Middle School students have a 15-minute break each morning with a healthy snack of fresh fruit and water. Lunch and recess is a 50-minute break. Students can go outside for recess every day that weather permits.

Nurse’s Office

The Nurse’s Office is located in the lower level near the Dining Hall. Students must ask a teacher before visiting the nurse, unless it is an emergency. The nurse will send a note to teachers and the Middle School Office and contact parents if a student needs to go home. If parents have given permission, the nurse can administer medications. Medical forms can be found on the Parent Portal and are mailed out prior to the start of the school year.

Parent-Teacher Conferences

There is one scheduled parent-teacher conferences for Grades 5 through 8 in the fall. However, additional parent-teacher conferences may occur any time during the school year. The conference may be initiated by the parent(s) or by the School. All Middle School parents are invited to attend Middle School teacher conferences with the student’s advisor after the Mid-Tri I (midway through the first trimester) grades are mailed out. Parents of students who are new to the Middle School division are strongly encouraged to come to the fall conferences.

Physical Exams, Immunizations, Medications, and Injuries

All students are required to have a current physical exam and completed medical history on file before the start of the school year. Immunization records are also required. The school nurse sends a reminder and forms home to families prior the beginning of the school year. Forms are also available on the Parent Portal. Grade 7 and 8 students participating in sports may be required to meet earlier deadlines. It is a good idea to make doctor appointments for students during the summer, prior to the August deadlines.

Productions

The Middle School produces a play/musical each year. Students in all Middle School grades are encouraged to audition for a role or volunteer for a behind-the-scenes position. Grade 5 and 6 students are most often cast in ensemble roles, and Grade 7 and 8 students are given major roles. The rehearsal schedule can be demanding. Students are responsible for completing homework and maintaining grades while participating in the play/musical.

Recycling

Harley asks that students recycle in designated plastic bins located on campus.

Safety Drills

Mandatory fire drills are planned throughout the school year. Students are prepared for the drills by faculty. Students should listen to their teachers, exit the building quietly, and assemble in the designated grade-level area. The Harley School Safety Committee plans an annual lockdown drill to prepare students and faculty in case of an intruder or other emergency within the School. Parents are notified prior to the lockdown drill and students are prepared in advance.

Service Learning

Service Learning is educationally-related work done in school or in the larger Rochester community, and is highly encouraged at The Harley School. It is designed to teach students how to care for their community and others. Service Learning is an integral part of Middle School. Students participate in appropriate grade-level activities and projects that benefit the community at large. Service projects are chosen by students and teachers and vary each year.

Standardized Tests

Standardized tests introduce students to the testing format and prepare them for future testing: PSATs, SATs, and ACTs. The data collected from standardized tests is instructional and compares knowledge and retention skills over time. The tests measure the progress of students and the effectiveness of education programs, providing direction for the adaptation of curriculum. Middle School students take ERB (Education Review Board) tests in Grade 6 and Grade 8. The name of the test is the CTP4, Comprehensive Testing Program.

Supplies

Supply lists are posted on our Parent Portal. Supplies should be purchased prior to the start of the school year and replenished as needed throughout the year.

Transportation

Busing is provided by each student’s home school district. Area school districts begin mailing transportation information to families in January. In most cases, the deadline to sign your student up for busing is April 1. Harley families are required to register their child in their home school district. School districts require a copy of the child’s birth certificate for registration and transportation.

School districts do not provide transportation to private schools when their own schools are not in session due to conference days, holidays, or superintendents’ days. Please arrange alternative transportation for children on the days your district’s schools are not in session.

Buses drop off and pick up in the bus loop in front of the School. Afternoon buses load students between 3:00 p.m. and 3:30 p.m.

Ground Rules

General Information

The rules and expectations outlined in the Middle School Handbook apply to events and behaviors in The Harley School community. It is very important, however, to note that the School does not limit its concern to events that happen on campus. Harley reserves the right to address student behavior at non-Harley events—perhaps off-campus, perhaps in cyberspace—if the School determines the behavior has a negative impact on The Harley School community.

During the School Day
  • Electronics should be stored in lockers between the hours of
    8:00 a.m. and 3:00 p.m.
  • No gum chewing.
  • Belongings and backpacks need to be kept in student lockers.
  • Language and dress need to be acceptable.
  • Academic honesty is expected at all times.
  • All medicines must be distributed by the nurse.
  • Appropriate community behavior is expected at all times.
  • Snowballs are not allowed on campus.
  • Visitors must have prior permission from the Middle School Head.
Serious Infractions
  • Will result in significant consequences.
  • Serious infractions could include: skipping class, theft, safety concerns, illegal possession of or involvement with drugs and/or weapons, leaving campus, socially inappropriate or chronic misbehavior.
Alcohol, Drugs, and Tobacco

New York State mandates that legal drugs may be taken at school only if written authorization is provided by a doctor and the parents. This includes common medications that may be bought without a prescription. If a student must take any of these at school, the nurse must have a written statement of authorization from
parents and a doctor.

Alcohol, tobacco, and illegal drugs are prohibited at all school-sponsored events whether on or off campus. Also, though the school assumes no responsibility for off-campus parties, it does reserve the right to discipline students for their off-campus behavior. Harley strongly opposes the use of alcohol and other drugs at any such gatherings.

Those who are involved with alcohol or illegal drugs in any way at school or at any school function risk legal consequences and a significant response from the School. Those who violate the School’s policy regarding alcohol and other drugs can expect:

  • Suspension or expulsion from School
  • To undergo a substance abuse assessment with a specialist in the field
  • To follow any recommendations that may come from that assessment as a condition of continued enrollment
Property

The willful damage of property, personal or public, is a serious offense against the community and will have appropriate consequences. Theft occurs occasionally at the school, and students should not be careless with their personal belongings. Any student who is found to have stolen something at school will be suspended or expelled.

Weapons

Students are specifically prohibited from bringing any object to school that could be used as a weapon.

Library and Computer Resources

General Information

The Library opens at 7:45 a.m. so that students may study there, use the copier and printer, use a computer, and return or check out books before classes begin. It remains open until 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday.

Most materials are shelved in the main reading room. In this section, there are also computers for student use. Back issues of many periodicals are shelved in the library workroom.

Audiovisual equipment is kept in the library workroom. Arrangements for use of this equipment should be made with the librarian.

The Library is available for quiet individual study and reading, cooperative study for groups, copying and printing, computer use, and online research.

Books may be checked out for three weeks with the privilege of renewal for an additional three weeks. Laptops may be borrowed for a period or two.

Student Acceptable Use Policy

The Harley School provides a variety of technological facilities to enrich the academic experience of the students. These facilities include computers, software, access to the internet, as well as other computing equipment. Students utilizing these resources are expected to follow these rules of conduct (guidelines from faculty and Upper School Student Council, 2009):

  • Always use the computer with consideration and respect for others.
  • Priority for computer use is given to students needing it for academic purposes.
  • Use appropriate and respectful language at all times.
  • Respect the integrity of computer resources by not relocating hardware, altering or modifying system files, desktop, or software configurations.
  • Understand that files stored on Harley network servers are subject to review and/ or monitoring by faculty and the School administration.
  • Adhere to laws concerning the use and distribution of copyrighted software.
  • Computer games are not permitted except after school hours and under the direction of a teacher as part of the curriculum.
  • Avoid abusing network resources such as sending chain letters or spam, or excessive printing.
  • Do not display, access, or send offensive messages or pictures.
  • Do not attempt to log in through another person’s account or access another person’s folders, work, or files.
  • Do not attempt to access websites blocked by school policy.
  • Do not plagiarize works found on the internet. Plagiarism is taking the ideas or writings of others and presenting them as if they were one’s own.
  • Failure to follow any of these rules will lead to disciplinary consequences.

School Traditions

September

Opening Day Assembly: The beginning of the school year is marked by the first procession into the Theater by the Senior Class. The Head of School gives the address, recognizes faculty and staff with 25 or more years of service, and welcomes new students and faculty.

New Parent Dinner: This event is sponsored by the Admissions Office and Parent Council to welcome new families into the Harley community. This dinner, held on campus, allows parents to meet Parent Council Coordinators, School administrators, Board members,
and other new parents.

Sundae Sunday: Our ice cream social is held annually to celebrate the start of the school year. The entire Harley community is invited to attend.

October

Halloween Parade: Harley’s Lower School dons their creative best as they parade throughout the School. They are joined by the Senior Class and various faculty members. The parade culminates in the Centrum with a special assembly for the students and teachers only. Parents may watch the parade in the Gallery or Theater.

November

Grandparents and Special Friends Day: Come share a fun morning on the selected date in November if you are a grandparent or special friend. This tradition for the entire School involves class visits and a special assembly. Invitations are sent based on information submitted by families.

Thanksgiving Assembly: The Thanksgiving Assembly is one of the times throughout the year when the entire School is brought together to celebrate. The Head of School addresses the students and faculty prior to the Thanksgiving recess.

December

Lower School Pageant: Each holiday season, the entire Harley community is delighted by the annual Pageant. This colorful, enchanting musical presentation takes place in the Theater and every child in the Lower School participates. Usually, Pageant is during the
second week of December. This is a not-to-be-missed event! Children are dismissed early after the Friday performance. This tradition began in 1934.

Holiday Banquet: The Holiday Banquet happens on the last day of school before December recess. The Senior Class prepares and serves a special meal for the rest of the School. They, along with the Upper School faculty, dress as elves and treat the whole School to a festive time complete with songs and stories.

Candlelight: The tradition of Candlelight began in 1926. This event happens in the evening on the last day of school prior to December recess. It is a formal event required for all Middle and Upper School students. This is one of two events during the year when Banner Bearers are chosen to represent their class in the procession and during the presentation of the banners. It is a beautiful celebration of the holiday season and it reflects the many cultural holidays observed by Harley’s diverse student body. Alumni of the School also return to participate in the procession.

January

Martin Luther King Jr. Day On of Service: Every MLK Day is a morning of service with projects open to all interested Lower School students and families. Our dining hall  transforms into a bustling space of activity for the greater local and global good. Projects and related activities will be communicated to the Lower School in advance.

Cabin Fever Reliever: Kids and parents play and have fun in the Field House!

February

Preview Night: The Lower School faculty holds a preview night for parents to learn more about the following year’s curricular program.

March

Blast! is the School’s premier fundraising event. There are two evenings of fun you can attend to support us. The proceeds directly impact every student and also provide funding for Horizons at Harley, a six-week summer enrichment program for Rochester City School
District students.

Blast! Reception and Silent Auction
This reception and silent auction is a casual evening of cocktails and hors d’oeuvres with a chance to bid on more than 200 auction items.

Blast! Gala and Live Auction
The gala and live auction is a spectacular evening, complete with high-end auction items, a cocktail hour sponsored by Constellation Brands, a plated dinner by Root Catering, followed by dancing.

April

Lower School Focus Week: The Lower School faculty choose a theme for all Lower School grades to study—with an emphasis on learning that is appropriate for the various grade levels. The projects last about one month. During the final week, students share what they
have learned during daily assemblies and activities. The week culminates with a special celebration for the entire Lower School.

May

Oak Tree Ceremony: Every May, before the Seniors leave for their internships, each member of the Senior Class gives an oak tree sapling to each member of the Kindergarten class at a ceremony in the Centrum. Since the oak tree is a symbol of the School, each kindergartener is entrusted with a young tree to nurture, which symbolically commemorates the child’s growth through the School.

May Day: When the trumpet sounds on a surprise day in May, all classes are canceled and the entire school goes outside for an afternoon full of activities and games to celebrate the arrival of spring. This long-standing tradition is eagerly anticipated by students and teachers alike.

EAT (Employee Appreciation Time): This day of appreciation for our faculty and staff is sponsored by Parent Council. The parents provide a sumptuous array of breakfast and lunch goodies for the faculty and staff to enjoy.

Nursery Bike Day: The Lower School bus loop is closed off for a day so that the “officers” in the 4-year-old Nursery can patrol the young bikers. Tickets are frequently given out for having too much fun!

Second Grade Overnight: Nothing in the Lower School compares to the Second Grade Overnight. From roasting marshmallows to tie-dyeing T-shirts, the children spend a fulfilled night here at the School. It is also the only night of the year that the famed Harley Ghost makes his presence known.

June

Grade 4 Moving-Up Ceremony: As Grade 4 prepares to leave the Lower School, the faculty holds a ceremony to commemorate our journey together. Parents are invited to attend.

Honors Assembly: Honors Assembly is an important way for Harley to celebrate the accomplishments of many students and, in particular, to recognize departing Seniors. The only Lower School award given is the Acorn Award, which recognizes a Grade 4 student who has been here for two years or more and best exemplifies the spirit of the School. It is awarded to a student who possesses qualities including leadership, cooperation, community spirit, intellectual curiosity, and perseverance. This student brings to Harley a commitment to doing their personal best and stands as an example to all. The assembly usually takes place on the last Thursday of the school year.

Commencement: The formal Harley Commencement is a beautiful and moving experience. This is the second event of the year when Banner Bearers are chosen. Speeches are given by a selected faculty member and members of the Senior Class. As a part of the ceremony, the longest-attending member(s) of the Senior Class presents their banner to a member of the incoming Grade 1.

Faculty and Staff

Middle School Faculty and Staff

Dr. Hassan Jones                           Head of Middle School
Mrs. Margaret Cusimano             Assistant to Head of                                                               MS/Registrar

Grade 5/6 Advisors                        Lee Allen                                                                                    Eileen Ferrari                                                                            Connie Moore                                                                          Ann Marie Mortimer
                                                          Lorie Rick                                                                                    Raj Singaravelu
Grade 7 /8 Advisors                       Doug Gilbert                                                                              Dan O’Brien,                                                                              Sandy Ramirez                                                                          Kirsten Reader
                                                          Carli Rivers                                                                                Rebecca Tracey

Special Area Teachers

Lisa Barker                            Food & Farm
Ben Burroughs                     Choir
Jessica Densmore                Latin
Kima Enerson                       Maker Educator
Linda Foster                          Drama
Beth Fox                                 Music
Kristy Houston                      Band
Elaine Mendola                     Library
Kelly Schroeder                     Strings
Meg Smerbeck                       SSP
Jean Weber                            Technology

Administrators and Other Staff

Mr. Larry Frye                           Head of School
Ms. Kirsten Reader ’90            Director of Admissions
Dr. Terry Smith                         Head of Lower School
Dr. Hassan Jones                      Head of Middle School
Ms. Kim McDowell                   Head of Upper School
Mr. Lars Kuelling                      Academic Dean
Mr. Peter Mancuso                  Athletic Director
Mr. Ken Motsenbocker           Chief Financial Officer
Ms. Whitney Brice                    Director of Development
Ms. Beth Bailey                         Director of Marketing and                                                      Communications
Ms. Sisi Chen                             Lower School/Middle                                                               School School Counselor
Mrs. Debora Houghtalen         School Nurse
Ms. Vicki Pasternak                   Dining Hall Supervisor
Ms. Amanda Patterson             Assistant Director of                                                                Admissions
Mrs. Cheryl Skiba                       Admissions Office                                                                    Assistant
Ms. Maria Sommerville             Executive Assistant to                                                              Head of School

The Harley School

1981 Clover Street
Rochester, NY 14618
(585) 442-1770

©2020 The Harley School